Digital Humanities Courses

A developing list of past and present offerings from our digital humanities curriculum

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INTRODUCTION TO PODCASTING

English 180

Professor Meredith May

In this course students will learn to produce documentary-style audio stories, as heard on Serial, This American Life, 99% Invisible, Planet Money, Snap Judgment, and Radiolab. You’ll practice hands-on recording and editing with both professional sound equipment and your cell phones, to develop your own podcast with direction from award-winning digital journalist, Meredith May...READ MORE

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DIGITAL HUMANITIES: ELECTRONIC LITERATURES

English 180/280

Professor Rebekah Edwards

“Born Digital” or electronic literature (e-lit) is a rapidly evolving field. New critical methodologies and scholarly approaches to these works are developing alongside such literary artistic practices as: hypertext fiction and poetry; computer art installations; interactive narratives and gaming applications...READ MORE

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QUEER SPECULATIVE FICTIONS: TEXTS AND DIGITAL CONTEXTS

Professor Rebekah Edwards

Fairytales, science fiction, fantasy, horror, utopian, dystopian, apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction all might be grouped under the larger category of “speculative fiction” – works that explore concerns about social identity and embodiment, politics, culture and the nature of “humanness” through the invention of landscapes, cultures, relationships and bodies different from those we currently recognize.

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DIGITAL STORYTELLING: WATER

Professor Sarah Pollock

Storytelling with digital tools breaks open new possibilities in narrative. In this collaborative course we will dive in deep to develop an understanding of how storytelling is being disrupted and reconstructed in response to emerging technologies. We will develop stories and create multiple responses around one widely conceived topic area. This semester, the topic will be water...READ MORE

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THE ONCE AND FUTURE STORY: TOPICS IN THEORY

Professor Kara Wittman

This will be a course in twentieth- and twenty-first century narrative theory extending from the European, Russian, and American formalist and linguistic work of the first decades of the twentieth century up to current Digital Humanities work being done on the analysis of narrative, novels, and stories.

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IMAGINARY LANDSCAPES

Professor Kirsten Saxton
Professor Ajuan Mance

This class takes as its focus the study of imaginary landscapes. The class is informed by our love of the places we find in books, by recent work in place theory, and by the digital humanities. In the first section of the course, we read novels together; we will conceptualize the ways space and place work in each novel and think about ways we might meaningfully interpret that space and its construction through a digital project...READ MORE

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JOURNALISM: TELLING TRUE STORIES

Professor Meredith May

This course will be a place to learn the digital art of journalistic storytelling. We will combine the bedrock skills of researching, reporting and newswriting with modern multimedia tools to create dynamic stories that engage and excite audiences. Then we will push a button and unleash those stories unto the world...READ MORE

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SURVEY OF AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE

Professor Ajuan Mance

The course introduces students to U.S. Black literature using three different approaches. The first two—1) through literary analysis and close reading approach and 2) through a literary historical lens—already play a critical part in the course’s current incarnation. The third approach–the Digital Humanities approach–will invite students to collaborate as a class in order to create a digital resource...READ MORE

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RACE, CLASS, AND WIZARDRY

Professor Ajuan Mance

In this course, we will read all seven of the novels in British author J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, as well as the three supplemental texts she produced during and shortly after the publication of the series, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, Quidditch Through the Ages, and The Tales of Beedle the Bard. The focus of our reading and analyses of these texts will be upon the ways the novels and supplemental texts portray, challenge, and address issues of class, race, gender, and sexual orientation. At the end of the course, each student will produce a digitally-based intoduction to the ways that a particular community of underrepresented people have used fan-generated materials to write their identity category into the the Harry Potter series...READ MORE

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QUEER KINSHIP

Professor Rebekah Edwards

In this course we will explore the critical, creative and activist possibilities put in motion by placing the terms queer and kinship in conversation. One definition of queer is that which questions, upsets, opposes, or subverts ideas and practices of normality, particularly in relation to (but not limited to) the binary relationship of “homosexuality” and “heterosexuality” as the main axis on which human sexuality is mapped, and the binary structure of “male” and “female” as the main axis on which gender is categorized. Kinship is often defined as relationships based in consanguinal (“blood”) or affinal (“by marriage”) ties, in other words, kinship is commonly understood to be about biological and legally sanctioned relationships...READ MORE

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REMIXING THE EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY NOVEL

Professor Kirsten Saxton

“An adaptation is not vampiric: it does not draw the life-blood from its source and leave it dying or dead, nor is it paler than the adapted work. It may, on the contrary, keep that prior work alive, giving it an afterlife it would never have had otherwise.” -Linda Hutcheon The eighteenth century has quite a bit of popular currency; we see adaptations of eighteenth-century literature and culture on tumblr, fan fiction, web series, scent lines, cult mashups, Facebook accounts, YouTube videos, fashion shoots, literary fiction, theater stagings, greeting cards, and in mainstream films. Adaptation is currently a lively intellectual topic, generating theoretical and applied research. This course builds on this rich scholarly and popular foundation to focus on adaptation and 18th-century fiction....READ MORE

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BRITISH SURVEY 2: BLOOD AND INK

Professor Kirsten Saxton

In this course we will survey writers and genres in British Literature since 1700. The course is organized chronologically (with a few exceptions) in order to suggest how British literature has developed with a strong awareness of the traditions and conventions of its past as well as to suggest how historical developments in society, politics and religion have affected the production and reception of literature...READ MORE